Tag: galveston

Coffee Table Book Blog

Today in Texas History: Hurricane Devastates Galveston

Today in Texas History: September 8th, 1900 Hurricane Devastates Galveston On this day in 1900, a catastrophic hurricane struck the city of Galveston on the Texas coast. A third of the city was destroyed, and 6,000 to 8,000 people died. Galveston Island was completely inundated. Property loss was estimated at $30 million. The storm is…
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This Day in Texas History: Pirate Resigns as Ruler of Galveston Island

This Day in Texas History: Pirate Resigns as Ruler of Galveston Island July 31, 1817 On this day in 1817, pirate Louis Michel Aury resigned his Mexican commission to rule Galveston Island. Aury, born in Paris about 1788, served in the French navy and on French privateers from 1802 or 1803 until 1810, when he…
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This Day in Texas History: Galveston’s Ashton Villa Restored

This Day in Texas History: Galveston’s Ashton Villa Restored July 25, 1974 On this day in 1974, the restored Ashton Villa, one of the first brick structures in Texas, was opened to the public. The historic Galveston home was built in 1859 by James Moreau Brown, who by the late 1850s had developed the largest…
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This day in Texas History: Virginia Point Benefits from Galveston Island Bridge

This day in Texas History: Virginia Point Benefits from Galveston Island Bridge February 06, 1860 On this day in 1860, the Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railroad completed its bridge from Virginia Point to Galveston Island. Virginia Point, on the mainland west of Galveston, was an outlying part of Stephen F. Austin’s Coast Colony. The bridge…
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This Day in Texas History: Juneteenth

This Day in Texas History: Juneteenth June 19, 1865 On June 19 1865, Union general Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued General Order Number 3, which read in part, “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves…
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This Day in Texas History: The Battle of San Jacinto

This Day in Texas History: The Battle of San Jacinto April 21, 1836 The battle of San Jacinto was the concluding military event of the Texas Revolution. On March 13, 1836, the revolutionary army at Gonzales began to retreat eastward. It crossed the Colorado River on March 17 and camped near present Columbus on March 20,…
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This day in Texas History: Eve of the Battle of San Jacinto

This day in Texas History: Eve of the Battle of San Jacinto April 20, 1836 After admonishing his troops to remember the massacres at San Antonio and at Goliad, Sam Houston and his forces crossed Buffalo Bayou on the evening of April 19. At dawn on April 20 the Texans resumed their trek down the bayou and at Lynch’s Ferry captured a…
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This Day in Texas History: Secessionist Fire-Eater Dies

This Day in Texas History: (from the Texas State Historical Association archives) Secessionist Fire-Eater Dies February18,1874 On this day in 1874, secessionist leader Louis T. Wigfall died in Galveston. The South Carolina native arrived in Texas in 1846 and settled in Nacogdoches, where he was a law partner of Thomas J. Jennings and William B. Ochiltree. Soon…
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1/6/2013 Daily Image: Galveston Mardi Gras Remnant

  1/6/2013 Daily Image: Mardi Gras Remnant Outside the Tremont House (an amazing hotel you should at least visit) in Galveston is this vivid remnant from the 1984 Mardi Gras.  There were several of these constructed for the 1984 celebration, but this is the only one that remains.  Illuminated for your enjoyment 365 days a year, this…
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This Day in Texas History: Galveston Connects to Virginia Point by Railroad Bridge

This Day in Texas History: (from the Texas State Historical Association archives) Galveston Connects to Virginia Point by Railroad Bridge February 06, 1860 On this day in 1860, the Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railroad completed its bridge from Virginia Point to Galveston Island. Virginia Point, on the mainland west of Galveston, was an outlying part of Stephen…
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