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This Day in Texas History: Alamo Survivor Dies

This Day in Texas History: Alamo Survivor Dies October 7, 1883 On this day in 1883, Susanna Wilkerson Dickinson, survivor of the Alamo, died in Austin. The Tennessee native married Almaron Dickinson in 1829 and moved to Gonzales, Texas, in 1831. Susanna’s only child, Angelina Elizabeth Dickinson, was born in 1834. Her husband went off…
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This Day in Texas History: Sam Houston Elected President of the Republic of Texas

This Day in Texas History: Sam Houston Elected President of the Republic of Texas September 5, 1836 On this day in 1836, Sam Houston, the victor of San Jacinto, was elected president of the newly founded Republic of Texas. Candidates for the office had included Henry Smith, governor of the provisional government, and Stephen F.…
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This Day in Texas History: Sam Houston Nominated for President of the Republic of Texas

This Day in Texas History: Sam Houston Nominated for President of the Republic of Texas August 15, 1836 On this day in 1836, Philip Sublett nominated Sam Houston for president of the Republic of Texas. Sublett, a Kentucky native, had participated in the battle of Nacogdoches in 1832 and was a delegate to the conventions…
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On This Day in Texas History: Convention Meets to Discuss Sectional Crisis

On This Day in Texas History: Convention Meets to Discuss Sectional Crisis June 03, 1850 On this day in 1850, delegates from the southern states collected in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss the sectional crisis resulting from the Mexican War. In 1849 a bipartisan convention met at Jackson, Mississippi, and called for a southern convention to…
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This Day in Texas History: Mexican Forces Capture Key Brazos Crossing

This Day in Texas History: Mexican Forces Capture Key Brazos Crossing April 12, 1836 On this day in 1836, Mexican forces under General Santa Anna captured Thompson’s Ferry, on the Brazos River between San Felipe and Fort Bend. As Sam Houston’s army retreated eastward, a rear-guard under Moseley Baker at San Felipe and Wyly Martin…
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This Day in Texas History: The Battle of San Jacinto

This Day in Texas History: The Battle of San Jacinto April 21, 1836 The battle of San Jacinto was the concluding military event of the Texas Revolution. On March 13, 1836, the revolutionary army at Gonzales began to retreat eastward. It crossed the Colorado River on March 17 and camped near present Columbus on March 20,…
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This day in Texas History: Eve of the Battle of San Jacinto

This day in Texas History: Eve of the Battle of San Jacinto April 20, 1836 After admonishing his troops to remember the massacres at San Antonio and at Goliad, Sam Houston and his forces crossed Buffalo Bayou on the evening of April 19. At dawn on April 20 the Texans resumed their trek down the bayou and at Lynch’s Ferry captured a…
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This Day in Texas History: Convention of 1836 Breaks Up in a Hurry

This Day in Texas History: Convention of 1836 Breaks Up in a Hurry March 17, 1836 On this day in 1836, the Convention of 1836 adjourned in haste as the Mexican army approached Washington-on-the-Brazos. The convention, which met on March 1, drafted the Texas Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the Republic of Texas,…
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This Day in Texas History: Texas Congress is History; Texas Legislature In Place

This Day in Texas History: (from the Texas State Historical Association archives) Texas Congress is History; Texas Legislature In Place February 19, 1846 On this day in 1846, the First Legislature of the state of Texas convened in Austin. The flag of the Republic of Texas was lowered, and the flag of the United States was raised.…
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This day in Texas History: “Know-Nothings” Abandon Secrecy, Meet in Austin

This day in Texas History: (from the Texas State Historical Association archives) “Know-Nothings” Abandon Secrecy, Meet in Austin January 21, 1856 On this day in 1856, the American or Know-Nothing party of Texas met for the first time in open convention in Austin. The party was the political manifestation of the xenophobic, anti-Catholic secret society known as the American…
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